On Fifth Anniversary of Citizens United Decision, Klobuchar Continues Push for Campaign Finance Reform

Since the Citizens United Supreme Court ruling, which allows special interests to spend unlimited amounts of money on federal election activity, Super PACs and other outside groups have dramatically increased their spending on federal elections

Klobuchar cosponsored a constitutional amendment to allow Congress to override the Citizens United and McCutcheon Supreme Court rulings and cosponsored legislation to boost transparency in political spending by special interests

Washington, DC – On the fifth anniversary of the Citizens United Supreme Court Ruling, U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar continued her push for campaign finance reform. Klobuchar cosponsored a constitutional amendment to allow Congress to override the Citizens United and McCutcheon Supreme Court rulings and cosponsored the DISCLOSE Act to boost transparency in political spending by special interests

“In the five years since Citizens United, there has been an unprecedented flow of special interest cash into political campaigns,” Klobuchar said. “This outside money is undermining our elections and shaking the public’s trust in our elections. That is why I am renewing my fight for meaningful campaign finance reform to boost transparency in political spending and ensure the voices of average Americans are heard.”

Since the Citizens United Supreme Court ruling, which allows special interests to spend unlimited amounts of money on federal election activity, Super PACs and other outside groups have dramatically increased their spending on federal elections. A recent report found that outside groups spent as much as $2.5 billion in the 2012 elections.

The constitutional amendment to override Citizens United and McCutcheon would allow Congress and the states to set reasonable limits on the raising and spending of money on elections. The DISCLOSE Act would help promote transparency in political spending by Super PACs and other groups. The bill would require certain organizations that spend over $10,000 on campaign activity to disclose their spending to the Federal Election Commission (FEC) within 24 hours and list any donor who gives over $10,000 to the organization.